Working Class

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DEFINITION of 'Working Class'

A socioeconomic term used to describe persons in a social class marked by jobs that provide low pay, require limited skill and/or physical labor, and have reduced education requirements. Unemployed persons or those supported by a social welfare program are often included in this group.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Working Class'

While "working class" is typically associated with manual labor and limited education, blue collar workers are vital to every economy. Karl Marx described the working class as the "proletariat", and that it was the working class who ultimately created the goods and provided the services that created a society's wealth.

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