Working Control

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DEFINITION of 'Working Control'

When a minority shareholder (or shareholders) has enough voting power to influence or determine corporate policy. Working control exists particularly in corporations with widely dispersed share ownership where no shareholder has a majority interest.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Working Control'

Working control exists when a minority shareholder or multiple minority shareholders unite to possess a controlling vote in a corporation. The opportunity for minority shareholders to gain this control is seen especially in corporations where there is no dominant majority (greater than 50%) shareholder. While there are no official benchmarks for defining working control, 20% ownership is often considered large enough to exhibit this level of influence.

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