World Economic Outlook - WEO

AAA

DEFINITION of 'World Economic Outlook - WEO'

A report by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) that contains analysis and projections of the integral elements of the IMF's surveillance of economic developments and policies in its member countries, and of the developments in the global financial markets and economic system. The World Economic Outlook (WEO) is usually prepared twice a year and is used in meetings of the International Monetary and Financial Committee.

BREAKING DOWN 'World Economic Outlook - WEO'

The WEO presents the IMF's analysis and projections of global economic developments and classifies their analysis by region and stage of economic development. This report is the main instrument of disseminating the findings and analysis of their global surveillance activities to the world.

RELATED TERMS
  1. International Monetary Fund - IMF

    An international organization created for the purpose of standardizing ...
  2. Gross Domestic Product - GDP

    The monetary value of all the finished goods and services produced ...
  3. Mixed Economic System

    An economic system that features characteristics of both capitalism ...
  4. Balance Of Payments (BOP)

    A record of all transactions made between one particular country ...
  5. Balance Of Trade - BOT

    The difference between a country's imports and its exports. Balance ...
  6. World Trade Organization - WTO

    An international organization dealing with the global rules of ...
Related Articles
  1. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Understanding Capital And Financial Accounts In The Balance Of Payments

    The current, capital and financial accounts compose a nation's balance of payments.
  2. Insurance

    What Is The World Bank?

    You've heard of the World Bank, now find out how it functions and why some groups oppose it.
  3. Options & Futures

    Explaining The World Through Macroeconomic Analysis

    From unemployment and inflation to government policy, learn what macroeconomics measures and how it affects everyone.
  4. Forex Education

    Global Trade And The Currency Market

    Learn how the Bretton Woods system got the ball rolling for world trade.
  5. Economics

    The Importance Of Inflation And GDP

    Learn the underlying theories behind these concepts and what they can mean for your portfolio.
  6. Fundamental Analysis

    An Introduction To The International Monetary Fund (IMF)

    Chances are you've heard of the IMF. But what does it do, and why is it so controversial?
  7. Economics

    What Is An Emerging Market Economy?

    Emerging markets provide new investment opportunities, but there are risks - both to residents and foreign investors.
  8. Personal Finance

    What Is The Bank For International Settlements?

    Get the scoop on the structure and functions of the oldest global financial institution.
  9. Economics

    Is a Recession Coming?

    In the space of a week, the VIX Index, a measure of market volatility, spiked from 13, suggesting extreme complacency, to over 50, evidencing total panic.
  10. Investing

    Finding Value in the Selloff Rubble

    Globally and in the United States, stocks are now in correction mode, with the recent erosion in equities in emerging markets and Europe in a bear market.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is GDP and why is it so important to investors?

    The gross domestic product (GDP) is one the primary indicators used to gauge the health of a country's economy. It represents ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How can I use a regression to see the correlation between prices and interest rates?

    In statistics, regression analysis is a widely used technique to uncover relationships among variables and determine whether ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What are the advantages and disadvantages of the International Monetary Fund?

    Established following World War II to help with post-war recovery, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) serves as a lender ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What are some of the limitations of run rates?

    Some limitations of a reliance on run rates include the occurrence of one-time sales, limitations on contracts, seasonality, ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How do externalities affect equilibrium and create market failure?

    The International Monetary Fund (IMF) was created in 1945 and is governed by and accountable to its 188 member countries. ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What are some real-life examples of the 80-20 rule (Pareto Principle) in practice?

    There are a number of practical applications for the 80-20 rule in diverse areas such as the distribution of wealth in economics, ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Stock Market Crash

    A rapid and often unanticipated drop in stock prices. A stock market crash can be the result of major catastrophic events, ...
  2. Financial Crisis

    A situation in which the value of financial institutions or assets drops rapidly. A financial crisis is often associated ...
  3. Election Period

    The period of time during which an investor who owns an extendable or retractable bond must indicate to the issuer whether ...
  4. Shanghai Stock Exchange

    The largest stock exchange in mainland China, the Shanghai Stock Exchange is a nonprofit organization run by the China Securities ...
  5. Dead Cat Bounce

    A temporary recovery from a prolonged decline or bear market, followed by the continuation of the downtrend. A dead cat bounce ...
  6. Bear Market

    A market condition in which the prices of securities are falling, and widespread pessimism causes the negative sentiment ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!