Worldwide Coverage

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DEFINITION of 'Worldwide Coverage '

An insurance policy provided by some insurance companies that globally covers the personal property of the insured against loss or damage. Examples of covered items include jewelry, furs, cameras, musical instruments, silverware/goldware, golf equipment, fine art (such as paintings, vases, antique furniture, oriental rugs, rare glass and china), collectibles, sports equipment and computer equipment.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Worldwide Coverage '

Certain insurance policies such as personal property insurance allow policyholders to add this type of coverage to their existing policy. The worldwide coverage can be requested in the amount needed for valuable possessions. Some limits apply to certain types of property, and some property might be excluded from coverage depending on the insurance company.

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