Writ Of Seizure And Sale


DEFINITION of 'Writ Of Seizure And Sale'

An order issued by a court that allows the petitioner (usually a creditor) ownership of certain property and the ability to sell it once it has taken possession. Writs of seizure and sale are used to take possession of property when a borrower is in default and allows the petitioner to use the assistance of law enforcement in seizing the property.

BREAKING DOWN 'Writ Of Seizure And Sale'

A writ of seizure and sale can't be obtained after a few missed payments. Instead, it's an aggressive move made when a borrower has ignored all other attempts at collection and defaulted on a debt.

Seized property may be sold at a low price in order to quickly recoup some losses.

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  3. External Claim

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  4. Creditor

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