Wrongful Termination Claim

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DEFINITION of 'Wrongful Termination Claim'

A claim filed in a court of law by someone who believes they were wrongly terminated from their job. Wrongful termination claims are filed when an employee believes they have been fired in violation of federal and state anti-discrimination laws, oral and written employment agreements, or labor laws, including collective bargaining laws. Employees who feel their termination was a form of sexual harassment or is in retaliation for having filed a complaint or claim against the employer may also file a claim.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Wrongful Termination Claim'

Employees who have not been fired yet can negotiate for an appropriate severance package. If they have been fired, they could ask for repayment of money damages. When faced with this type of situation, it is recommended that the employee avoid acting on negative instincts toward the employer but instead contact an employees' rights lawyer for advice and representation. It's also essential to first read the employment contract to find out what rights and resources the employee has available.



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