X

AAA

DEFINITION of 'X'

1. A Nasdaq stock symbol specifying that it is a mutual fund.

2. A symbol used in stock transaction tables found on the internet and in newspapers to indicate that a stock is trading ex-dividends or ex-rights.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'X'

1. Nasdaq-listed securities have four or five characters. If a fifth letter appears, it identifies the issue as other than a single issue of common stock or capital stock.

2. Typically after a dividend is paid or a right is distributed, a stock's price will drop by a similar amount. Because of this, it's important for investors to be aware of when a distribution is made so that the depreciation in price is not mistaken for something else.

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