XD

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DEFINITION

A symbol used to signify that a security is trading ex-dividend. XD is an alphabetic qualifier that acts as shorthand to tell investors key information about a specific security in a stock quote. Sometimes "X" alone is used to indicate that the stock is trading ex-dividend. Qualifiers can vary depending on where the stock is quoted, because different news services that supply stock quotes may use different qualifiers.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

A dividend is a distribution of part of a company's earnings to the company's shareholders. When a stock is trading ex-dividend, the current stockholder has received a recent dividend payment and whoever purchases the stock will not receive the dividend. The stock's price should be lower as a result. There are quite a few qualifiers that relate to dividends; "j," indicates that the stock paid a dividend earlier in the year, but currently does not carry a dividend.


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