XW

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DEFINITION of 'XW'

A symbol used to signify that a security is trading ex-warrant. XW is one of many alphabetic qualifiers that act as a shorthand to tell investors key information about a specific security in a stock quote. These qualifiers should not be confused with ticker symbols, some of which, like qualifiers, are just one or two letters. The qualifier will follow the ticker symbol and be preceded by a space or hyphen.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'XW'

Warrants are issued by the same company that issued the stock and can be traded with that stock or separately. A stock trading with warrants attached uses the qualifier "ww." A warrant gives the holder the right, but not the obligation, to purchase additional stock from, or sell stock back to, the issuer at a predetermined price within a specific time frame, usually a few years. A stock that is trading ex-warrant previously had a warrant attached but no longer does. The stock's price should be lower as a result.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Naked Warrant

    A warrant that is issued without a host bond. A naked warrant ...
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  3. Detachable Warrant

    A derivative that is attached to a security and gives the holder ...
  4. Warrant

    A derivative security that gives the holder the right to purchase ...
  5. Harmless Warrant

    A warrant that requires the holder to surrender a similar bond ...
  6. Warrant Premium

    The amount that an investor must pay above the current market ...
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