Yard

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DEFINITION of 'Yard'

A financial term meaning one billion. Yard is derived from the term "milliard" which is used in some European languages and is equivalent to the number one billion used in American English. It is equal to 10y (10 to the ninth power), or the number one followed by nine zeros: 1,000,000,000. If someone were to purchase one billion U.S. dollars, he or she could refer to the purchase as "a yard of U.S. dollars."

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Yard'

The slang term yard refers to one billion and may offer a concise method of naming the figure which cannot be confused with the rhyming "million" and "trillion." Different terminology is used throughout the world for identifying large numbers. For example, one billion can be called one yard, one milliard, or one thousand million, depending on the country.

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