Yield Spread

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DEFINITION of 'Yield Spread'

The difference between yields on differing debt instruments, calculated by deducting the yield of one instrument from another. The higher the yield spread, the greater the difference between the yields offered by each instrument. The spread can be measured between debt instruments of differing maturities, credit ratings and risk.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Yield Spread'

Looking at the yield spread, often with historical spreads, can give investors ideas for potential investment opportunities.

For example, if the five-year Treasury bond is at 5% and the 30-year Treasury bond is at 6%, the yield spread between the two debt instruments is 1% (6% - 5%). If the yield spread has historically been closer to 5%, the investor is much more likely to invest in the five-year bond compared to the 30-year bond (as it should be trading around 1% instead of 6%).

In other words, if the 30-year bond is trading at 6%, then based on the historical yield spread, the five-year should be trading at around 1%, making it very attractive at its current yield of 5%.

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