Year To Date - YTD

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DEFINITION of 'Year To Date - YTD'

The period beginning January 1st of the current year up until today's date.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Year To Date - YTD'

YTD describes the return so far this year. For example: the year to date (ytd) return is 5%."

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