Zero-Lot-Line House

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DEFINITION of 'Zero-Lot-Line House '

A piece of residential real estate in which the structure comes up to or very near to the edge of the property line. Zero-lot-line house are built very close to the property line in order to create more usable space. Rowhouses, garden homes, patio homes and townhomes are all types of properties that may be zero-lot-line homes. They may be attached (as in a townhome) or detached, single story or multistory.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Zero-Lot-Line House '

Zero lot line homes are not just for low-income homebuyers: they are an attractive option for anyone who doesn't have the time or inclination to maintain a large yard. They are also an appealing alternative to condos because they offer greater privacy and independence while still being low maintenance. However, window placement, noise and a lack of privacy can be issues with these types of homes since there is little to no buffer zone surrounding them.



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