Zero Uptick

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DEFINITION of 'Zero Uptick'

A transaction executed at the same price as the trade immediately preceding it, but at a price higher than the transaction before that. For example, if shares are bought and sold at $47, followed by $48 and $48, the last trade at $48 is considered to be a zero uptick. This distinction can be important for short sellers trying to avoid shorting an ascending stock. Also known as a zero-plus tick.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Zero Uptick'

The technique of shorting on a zero uptick is not applicable to all investment markets, due to various rules and regulations prohibiting or restricting such transactions. The forex market, which has limited restrictions on shorting, is among the markets in which the technique is more popular.

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