Zero Uptick


DEFINITION of 'Zero Uptick'

A transaction executed at the same price as the trade immediately preceding it, but at a price higher than the transaction before that. For example, if shares are bought and sold at $47, followed by $48 and $48, the last trade at $48 is considered to be a zero uptick. This distinction can be important for short sellers trying to avoid shorting an ascending stock. Also known as a zero-plus tick.


The technique of shorting on a zero uptick is not applicable to all investment markets, due to various rules and regulations prohibiting or restricting such transactions. The forex market, which has limited restrictions on shorting, is among the markets in which the technique is more popular.

  1. Uptick

    A transaction for a financial instrument that occurs at a higher ...
  2. Zero Plus Tick

    A security trade that is executed at the same price as the preceding ...
  3. Uptick Rule

    A former rule established by the SEC that requires that every ...
  4. Short Sale

    A market transaction in which an investor sells borrowed securities ...
  5. Downtick

    A transaction on an exchange that occurs at a price below the ...
  6. Uptick Volume

    The volume of shares of a security that are traded when the price ...
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