20 Investments: Mortgage-Backed Securities
  1. 20 Investments: Introduction
  2. 20 Investments: American Depository Receipt (ADR)
  3. 20 Investments: Annuity
  4. 20 Investments: Closed-End Investment Fund
  5. 20 Investments: Collectibles
  6. 20 Investments: Common Stock
  7. 20 Investments: Convertible Security
  8. 20 Investments: Corporate Bond
  9. 20 Investments: Futures Contract
  10. 20 Investments: Life Insurance
  11. 20 Investments: The Money Market
  12. 20 Investments: Mortgage-Backed Securities
  13. 20 Investments: Municipal Bonds
  14. 20 Investments: Mutual Funds
  15. 20 Investments: Options (Stocks)
  16. 20 Investments: Preferred Stock
  17. 20 Investments: Real Estate & Property
  18. 20 Investments: Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs)
  19. 20 Investments: Treasuries
  20. 20 Investments: Unit Investment Trusts (UITs)
  21. 20 Investments: Zero-Coupon Securities
  22. 20 Investments: Conclusion

20 Investments: Mortgage-Backed Securities

What Is it?
A mortgage-backed security (MBS), also known as a "mortgage pass-through" or a "pass-through certificate", is an investment instrument that represents ownership of an undivided interest in a group of mortgages. Principal and interest from the individual mortgages are used to pay principal and interest on the MBS.

When you invest in a mortgage-backed security, you are lending money to a homebuyer or a business. MBSs are a way for small regional banks to give mortgages to their customers without having to worry if they have the assets to cover the loan. Instead, the bank acts as an intermediary between the homebuyer and the investment markets.

Who pools these mortgages together? The majority of MBSs are issued and backed by government-sponsored corporations such as the Government National Mortgage Association (Ginnie Mae), Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (Freddie Mac) and the Federal National Mortgage Association (Fannie Mae). Each entity offers a slightly different variation in the securities it issues. Ginnie Mae MBSs are typically the most popular and widely held because they are backed by the U.S. government, whereas Fannie Mae is government sponsored but also trades as a public company.

Objectives and Risks
Mortgage-backed securities are an undiscovered gem. While these securities are primarily used to provide safe income, there is also the opportunity to get some capital appreciation as interest rates fall. Another advantage to MBSs is that they are very suitable for most tax-deferred savings accounts.

Generally, MBSs are traded actively, much like bonds are, so there is very little liquidity risk. Furthermore, they are considered an extremely safe investment, often said to have the same credit worthiness as treasuries but with a return that is 1-2% greater. Monthly income from MBSs can vary as interest rates change because mortgages can be prepaid, and when interest rates are falling, prepayments tend to rise. Prepayments only shorten the life of the MBS and are passed directly to the investors.

How To Buy or Sell It
Mortgage-backed securities can be purchased at almost any full-service broker. More and more discount brokers are offering MBSs as well. These securities don't come cheap - most are sold in chunks of $25,000. But there are some variations of MBS (called collateralized mortgage obligations, or CMOs) that can sell for under $5,000.



Strengths
  • Very low-risk investment that offers a return that\'s 1-2% higher than comparable low-risk securities.
  • Most MBSs are either fully backed or sponsored by the U.S. government.

  • Weaknesses
  • Minimum investment can be fairly high, upwards of $25,000.
  • Outside of a retirement account, there are virtually no tax advantages to owning an MBS. The income from an MBS is taxed as regular income.

  • Three Main Uses
  • Provide Income
  • Capital Appreciation
  • Tax-Deferred Savings
  • 20 Investments: Municipal Bonds

    1. 20 Investments: Introduction
    2. 20 Investments: American Depository Receipt (ADR)
    3. 20 Investments: Annuity
    4. 20 Investments: Closed-End Investment Fund
    5. 20 Investments: Collectibles
    6. 20 Investments: Common Stock
    7. 20 Investments: Convertible Security
    8. 20 Investments: Corporate Bond
    9. 20 Investments: Futures Contract
    10. 20 Investments: Life Insurance
    11. 20 Investments: The Money Market
    12. 20 Investments: Mortgage-Backed Securities
    13. 20 Investments: Municipal Bonds
    14. 20 Investments: Mutual Funds
    15. 20 Investments: Options (Stocks)
    16. 20 Investments: Preferred Stock
    17. 20 Investments: Real Estate & Property
    18. 20 Investments: Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs)
    19. 20 Investments: Treasuries
    20. 20 Investments: Unit Investment Trusts (UITs)
    21. 20 Investments: Zero-Coupon Securities
    22. 20 Investments: Conclusion
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    RELATED FAQS
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    3. What's the difference between a collateralized mortgage obligation (CMO) and a mortgage-backed ...

      Find out more about collateralized mortgage obligations and mortgage-backed securities and the difference between the two ... Read Answer >>
    4. Can small investors buy collateralized mortgage obligations (CMOs)?

      Read about collateralized mortgage obligations and their relationship with small investors, plus what risks small investors ... Read Answer >>
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