ADR Basics: Risks
AAA
  1. ADR Basics: Introduction
  2. ADR Basics: What Is An ADR?
  3. ADR Basics: Determining Price
  4. ADR Basics: Risks
  5. ADR Basics: Conclusion

ADR Basics: Risks


There are several factors that determine the value of the ADR beyond the performance of the company. Analyzing these foreign companies involves further scrutiny than merely looking at the fundamentals. Here are some other risks that investors should consider:

  • Political Risk - Ask yourself if you think the government in the home country of the ADR is stable? For example, you might be wary of Russian Vodka Inc. because of the characteristic instability of the Russian government.

  • Exchange Rate Risk - Is the currency of the home country stable? Remember the ADR shares track the shares in the home country. If a country's currency is devalued, it will trickle down to your ADR. This can result in a big loss, even if the company had been performing well.

  • Inflationary Risk - This is an extension of the exchange rate risk. Inflation is the rate at which the general level of prices for goods and services is rising and, subsequently, purchasing power is falling. Inflation can be a big blow to business because the currency of a country with high inflation becomes less and less valuable each day.
ADR Basics: Conclusion

  1. ADR Basics: Introduction
  2. ADR Basics: What Is An ADR?
  3. ADR Basics: Determining Price
  4. ADR Basics: Risks
  5. ADR Basics: Conclusion
RELATED TERMS
  1. Brazil, Russia, India And China - BRIC

    An acronym for the economies of Brazil, Russia, India and China ...
  2. Optimal Currency Area

    The geographic area in which a single currency would create the ...
  3. European Sovereign Debt Crisis

    A period of time in which several European countries faced the ...
  4. Welfare Capitalism

    Definition of welfare capitalism.
  5. Foreign remittance

  6. Bid Wanted

    An announcement by an investor who holds a security that he or ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is a stock split? Why do stocks split?

    All publicly-traded companies have a set number of shares that are outstanding on the stock market. A stock split is a decision ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Is there a difference between financial spread betting and arbitrage?

    Financial spread betting is a type of speculation that involves a highly leveraged derivative product, whereas arbitrage ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How do I place an order to buy or sell shares?

    It is easy to get started buying and selling stocks, especially with the advancements in online trading since the turn of ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What does a high turnover ratio signify for an investment fund?

    If an investment fund has a high turnover ratio, it indicates it replaces most or all of its holdings over a one-year period. ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How are American Depository Receipts (ADRs) priced?

    The price of an American depositary receipt (ADR) is determined by the bank or other financial institution that issues it. ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How does a forward contract differ from a call option?

    Forward contracts and call options are different financial instruments that allow two parties to purchase or sell assets ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!