How To Analyze ETFs With Bloomberg
  1. How To Analyze ETFs With Bloomberg: Introduction
  2. How To Analyze ETFs With Bloomberg: Navigating The ETF Universe
  3. How To Analyze ETFs With Bloomberg: Comparing ETFs
  4. How To Analyze ETFs With Bloomberg: Trading ETFs

How To Analyze ETFs With Bloomberg: Introduction

Bloomberg can be used to analyze almost any asset class, including exchange traded funds (ETFs) This article will outline some of the ways in which Bloomberg can be used to specifically analyze the ETF market.

Note: because ETFs track other asset classes such as stocks, bonds and commodities, you might also want to use Bloomberg for analyzing the asset classes and securities that an ETF tracks. The best starting point for evaluating ETFs on Bloomberg is accessed by typing <FUND> into the terminal. This screen brings up a menu with a variety of fund functions, including screening tools, ETF-specific news menus and tools for analyzing the asset class. The functions found on the <FUND> page (as well as the other functions discussed in this article) should provide a good starting point for your ETF analysis, but as you navigate Bloomberg, you'll undoubtedly discover additional useful functions. Whenever you have specific questions, you can contact the Bloomberg helpdesk or access Bloomberg University by typing <BU> into the terminal. The Bloomberg University offers a variety of seminars, training videos and other learning materials, some of which focus on ETFs.

Figure 1 - Funds and Holdings


How To Analyze ETFs With Bloomberg: Navigating The ETF Universe

  1. How To Analyze ETFs With Bloomberg: Introduction
  2. How To Analyze ETFs With Bloomberg: Navigating The ETF Universe
  3. How To Analyze ETFs With Bloomberg: Comparing ETFs
  4. How To Analyze ETFs With Bloomberg: Trading ETFs
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