All About Banking
  1. Banking: Introduction
  2. Banking: Why Use A Bank?
  3. Banking: How To Choose A Bank
  4. Banking: Check-Writing 101
  5. Banking: Making Deposits
  6. Banking: Debit Cards and ATMs
  7. Banking: Managing Your Checking Account
  8. Banking: Savings Accounts 101
  9. Banking: Safeguarding Your Accounts
  10. Banking: Conclusion

Banking: Introduction

By Amy Fontinelle

Whether you're new to the United States, a teenager or young adult opening an account for the first time, or you just want a better understanding of one of the main places to stash your money and start building wealth, this tutorial will tell you everything you need to know about how checking and savings accounts work.

To get started with banking, you'll need to decide what bank you want to use and open an account. In this section, we'll tell you how to take these first steps. But first, let's answer the question that surprisingly, a lot people who are unfamiliar with banking still ask: Why use a bank in the first place?
Banking: Why Use A Bank?

  1. Banking: Introduction
  2. Banking: Why Use A Bank?
  3. Banking: How To Choose A Bank
  4. Banking: Check-Writing 101
  5. Banking: Making Deposits
  6. Banking: Debit Cards and ATMs
  7. Banking: Managing Your Checking Account
  8. Banking: Savings Accounts 101
  9. Banking: Safeguarding Your Accounts
  10. Banking: Conclusion
RELATED TERMS
  1. Debit Card

    An electronic card issued by a bank which allows bank clients ...
  2. Credit Union

    Member-owned financial co-operative. These institutions are created ...
  3. Check

    A written, dated and signed instrument that contains an unconditional ...
  4. Bank Deposits

    Money placed into a banking institution for safekeeping. Bank ...
  5. Cost Of Funds

    The interest rate paid by financial institutions for the funds ...
  6. Average Revenue Per User (ARPU)

    A measure of how much income a business generates, given the ...
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