Beginner's Guide To J-Trader
  1. Beginner's Guide To J-Trader: Introduction
  2. Beginner's Guide To J-Trader: Electronic Futures Trading Background
  3. Beginner's Guide To J-Trader: Getting Started
  4. Beginner's Guide To J-Trader: Key Features
  5. Beginner's Guide To J-Trader: Configuring J-Trader with the Settings Screen
  6. Beginner's Guide To J-Trader: Conclusion

Beginner's Guide To J-Trader: Introduction

Patsystems, the company behind J-Trader. was founded in 1994 by a team of forward-looking derivatives traders and IT professionals.

Widely used by banks, hedge funds, trading firms, and professional and retail traders around the world, Patsystems facilitates and enhances the electronic trading of futures, commodities, foreign exchange and other asset classes.

Key business areas of the company now include trading solutions, including front-end applications (J-Trader falls into this category), risk management solutions and exchange connectivity solutions via FIX (Financial Information Exchange), and proprietary API.

Patsystems has seven global locations, with offices in London, Chicago, Singapore, New York, Sydney, Tokyo and Hong Kong.

Currently, Patsystems offers three "front ends" for traders: Pro-Mark, J-Trader and IQ-Trader. The term "front end" is used to describe the user interface or order entry platform.

Pro-Mark is the most advanced premium application available, geared towards professional traders using complex strategies across multiple markets and exchanges.

Among the advanced features of Pro-Mark are multi-leg spreading across multiple exchanges and a "spread matrix" combining outrights, calendars, condors, packs and bundles on one screen. Pro-Mark also offers advanced order types, such as Icebergs and Block Trades.

J-Trader is a platform for trading futures and options that also enables trading strategies such as spreading. J-Trader is widely used among retail traders and investors, and the software is sometimes white labeled by brokerage firms and introducing brokers. J-Trader can connect to exchanges over WANs (Wide Area Networks), LANs (Local Area Networks), leased lines or via the Internet.

Key platform features include single-click trading, multi-exchange spreading, protection of orders with trailing stops and brackets orders, single and multiple account trading, and integrated charting powered by Market-Q.

IQ-Trader is focused towards technical and system traders, hedge fund managers and commodity trading advisors. IQ-Trader enables sophisticated trading operations without needing programming knowledge. The user can create studies, trade guards and complex strategies simply by pointing and clicking within the platform. IQ-Trader also provides strategy backtesting and optimization features.

SEE: Beginner's Guide To MultiCharts Trading Platform

Beginner's Guide To J-Trader: Electronic Futures Trading Background

  1. Beginner's Guide To J-Trader: Introduction
  2. Beginner's Guide To J-Trader: Electronic Futures Trading Background
  3. Beginner's Guide To J-Trader: Getting Started
  4. Beginner's Guide To J-Trader: Key Features
  5. Beginner's Guide To J-Trader: Configuring J-Trader with the Settings Screen
  6. Beginner's Guide To J-Trader: Conclusion
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