Beginner's Guide To Trading Futures: Conclusion
  1. Beginner's Guide To Trading Futures: Introduction
  2. Beginner's Guide To Trading Futures: The Basic Structure of the Futures Market
  3. Beginner's Guide To Trading Futures: Considerations Prior to Trading Futures
  4. Beginner's Guide To Trading Futures: Evaluating Futures
  5. Beginner's Guide To Trading Futures: A Real-World Example
  6. Beginner's Guide To Trading Futures: Conclusion

Beginner's Guide To Trading Futures: Conclusion

This Beginner's Guide to Trading Futures has provided an overview of how to begin evaluating and trading futures. Because the futures market tracks so many different indexes and commodities, it can be extremely complicated. Therefore it is important that you thoroughly understand the market which underlies the futures contracts that you are trading. Furthermore, because of the leverage they employ, trading futures can be extremely dangerous, so it is also very important that you employ rigorous risk management to your futures trading program. Furthermore, studies have shown that as many as 90% of futures traders lose money, so you should never trade futures with capital you cannot afford to lose.

Hopefully, this guide has provided you with a strong foundation from which to begin further research. If you have decided that futures trading is right for you, you will be well-served to thoroughly research both the futures market in general and your chosen subsector of the market specifically. The more knowledge and experience you have, the more likely you are to be a successful futures trader.

  1. Beginner's Guide To Trading Futures: Introduction
  2. Beginner's Guide To Trading Futures: The Basic Structure of the Futures Market
  3. Beginner's Guide To Trading Futures: Considerations Prior to Trading Futures
  4. Beginner's Guide To Trading Futures: Evaluating Futures
  5. Beginner's Guide To Trading Futures: A Real-World Example
  6. Beginner's Guide To Trading Futures: Conclusion
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