Capital Budgeting
  1. Capital Budgeting: Introduction
  2. Capital Budgeting: The Importance Of Capital Budgeting
  3. Capital Budgeting: Evaluating The Desirability Of An Investment
  4. Capital Budgeting: Capital Budgeting Decision Tools
  5. Capital Budgeting: The Capital Budgeting Process At Work
  6. Capital Budgeting: Wrapping It All Up

Capital Budgeting: Introduction

All of us, at one time or another, have had to deal with either preparing or following a budget. In fact, many households manage their financial affairs through a budget. Businesses do the same thing through what is known as capital budgeting.

The process of capital budgeting is vital to any responsible, well managed business. If that business is public and owned by public shareholders, the budgeting process becomes more crucial, since shareholders can hold management accountable for accepting unprofitable projects that can have the effect of destroying shareholder value.

Capital Budgeting: The Importance Of Capital Budgeting

  1. Capital Budgeting: Introduction
  2. Capital Budgeting: The Importance Of Capital Budgeting
  3. Capital Budgeting: Evaluating The Desirability Of An Investment
  4. Capital Budgeting: Capital Budgeting Decision Tools
  5. Capital Budgeting: The Capital Budgeting Process At Work
  6. Capital Budgeting: Wrapping It All Up


RELATED TERMS
  1. Tight Monetary Policy

    A course of action undertaken by the Federal Reserve to constrict ...
  2. Laissez Faire

    An economic theory from the 18th century that is strongly opposed ...
  3. Sortino Ratio

    A modification of the Sharpe ratio that differentiates harmful ...
  4. IRR Rule

    A measure for evaluating whether to proceed with a project or ...
  5. Climate Finance

    Climate finance is a finance channel by which developed economies ...
  6. Financial Modeling

    The process by which a firm constructs a financial representation ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is finance?

    "Finance" is a broad term that describes two related activities: the study of how money is managed and the actual process ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the difference between positive and normative economics?

    Positive economics is objective and fact based, while normative economics is subjective and value based. Positive economic ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How do you calculate working capital?

    Working capital represents the difference between a firm’s current assets and current liabilities. The challenge can be determining ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Do you discount working capital in net present value (NPV)?

    Net present value (NPV) calculations should include the discounted value of changes in working capital. This treatment of ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How is working capital different from fixed capital?

    There are several key differences between working capital and fixed capital. Most importantly, these two forms of capital ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How much working capital does a small business need?

    The amount of working capital a small business needs to run smoothly depends largely on the type of business, its operating ... Read Full Answer >>
Hot Definitions
  1. Super Bowl Indicator

    An indicator based on the belief that a Super Bowl win for a team from the old AFL (AFC division) foretells a decline in ...
  2. Flight To Quality

    The action of investors moving their capital away from riskier investments to the safest possible investment vehicles. This ...
  3. Discouraged Worker

    A person who is eligible for employment and is able to work, but is currently unemployed and has not attempted to find employment ...
  4. Ponzimonium

    After Bernard Madoff's $65 billion Ponzi scheme was revealed, many new (smaller-scale) Ponzi schemers became exposed. Ponzimonium ...
  5. Quarterly Earnings Report

    A quarterly filing made by public companies to report their performance. Included in earnings reports are items such as net ...
Trading Center