Capital Budgeting
AAA
  1. Capital Budgeting: Introduction
  2. Capital Budgeting: The Importance Of Capital Budgeting
  3. Capital Budgeting: Evaluating The Desirability Of An Investment
  4. Capital Budgeting: Capital Budgeting Decision Tools
  5. Capital Budgeting: The Capital Budgeting Process At Work
  6. Capital Budgeting: Wrapping It All Up

Capital Budgeting: Introduction

All of us, at one time or another, have had to deal with either preparing or following a budget. In fact, many households manage their financial affairs through a budget. Businesses do the same thing through what is known as capital budgeting.

The process of capital budgeting is vital to any responsible, well managed business. If that business is public and owned by public shareholders, the budgeting process becomes more crucial, since shareholders can hold management accountable for accepting unprofitable projects that can have the effect of destroying shareholder value.

Capital Budgeting: The Importance Of Capital Budgeting

  1. Capital Budgeting: Introduction
  2. Capital Budgeting: The Importance Of Capital Budgeting
  3. Capital Budgeting: Evaluating The Desirability Of An Investment
  4. Capital Budgeting: Capital Budgeting Decision Tools
  5. Capital Budgeting: The Capital Budgeting Process At Work
  6. Capital Budgeting: Wrapping It All Up
RELATED TERMS
  1. Discount Bond

    A bond that is issued for less than its par (or face) value, ...
  2. Internal Rate Of Return - IRR

    A metric used in capital budgeting measuring the profitability ...
  3. Net Present Value - NPV

    The difference between the present values of cash inflows and ...
  4. Financial Singularity

    A financial singularity is the point at which investment decisions ...
  5. Revenue-based Financing

    Revenue-based financing, also known as royalty based financing, ...
  6. Cost Test

    A standard test applied to a process to determine if the net ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the formula for calculating weighted average cost of capital (WACC) in Excel?

    When analyzing different financing options, companies need to look at how much it will cost to fund operations. There are ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the difference between called-up share capital and paid-up share capital?

    The difference between called-up share capital and paid-up share capital is investors have already paid in full for paid-up ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is the utility function and how is it calculated?

    In economics, utility function is an important concept that measures preferences over a set of goods and services. Utility ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How does additional paid in capital affect retained earnings?

    Both additional paid-in capital and retained earnings are entries under the shareholders' equity section of a company's balance ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What types of capital are not considered share capital?

    The money a business uses to fund operations or growth is called capital, and there are a number of capital sources available. ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is the difference between issued share capital and subscribed share capital?

    The difference between subscribed share capital and issued share capital is the former relates to the amount of stock for ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!