How To Analyze Corporate Bonds With Bloomberg Terminals
  1. How To Analyze Corporate Bonds With Bloomberg Terminals: Introduction
  2. How To Analyze Corporate Bonds With Bloomberg Terminals: Analyzing Corporate Bonds
  3. How To Analyze Corporate Bonds With Bloomberg Terminals: Valuing Corporate Bonds
  4. How To Analyze Corporate Bonds With Bloomberg Terminals: Trading Bonds On Bloomberg
  5. How To Analyze Corporate Bonds With Bloomberg Terminals: Conclusion

How To Analyze Corporate Bonds With Bloomberg Terminals: Introduction

Bloomberg was originally designed as a tool for bond traders, and as such it's capabilities for analyzing corporate bonds are extremely robust. This article will provide an overview of some of the functions users might find helpful when evaluating and trading corporate bonds. A good place to start is by using Bloomberg to screen for bonds that meet certain criteria. For example, if you know you are interested in purchasing IBM bonds but don't know precisely which issue you want, Bloomberg can help. By typing the ticker symbol for IBM into the Bloomberg <IBM> followed by the corporate bond function key <CORP> you will receive a listing of all the available corporate bond issues that IBM has. The bonds will be listed in maturity order, and by clicking on any issue you will be able to pull up details on the bond.

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How To Analyze Corporate Bonds With Bloomberg Terminals: Analyzing Corporate Bonds

  1. How To Analyze Corporate Bonds With Bloomberg Terminals: Introduction
  2. How To Analyze Corporate Bonds With Bloomberg Terminals: Analyzing Corporate Bonds
  3. How To Analyze Corporate Bonds With Bloomberg Terminals: Valuing Corporate Bonds
  4. How To Analyze Corporate Bonds With Bloomberg Terminals: Trading Bonds On Bloomberg
  5. How To Analyze Corporate Bonds With Bloomberg Terminals: Conclusion
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RELATED FAQS
  1. Why are simple-interest loans preferred by payday loan companies and pawn shops?

    Learn how you can invest in the corporate bond market without investing a large amount of capital through bond funds and ... Read Answer >>
  2. What forms of debt security are available for the average investor?

    Discover the various different types of debt securities, issued by government entities or corporations, that are available ... Read Answer >>
  3. Where can I get bond market quotes?

    Getting bond quotes and general information about a bond issue is considerably more difficult than researching a stock or ... Read Answer >>
  4. Where can I find information about corporate bond issues?

    Learn information about corporate bond investments, including where investors can access information about new corporate ... Read Answer >>
  5. What determines the price of a bond in the open market?

    Learn more about some of the factors that influence the valuation of bonds on the open market, and why bond prices and yields ... Read Answer >>
  6. Do long-term bonds have a greater interest rate risk than short-term bonds?

    The answer to this question lies in the fixed income nature of bonds and debentures, often referred to together simply as ... Read Answer >>

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