How To Analyze Corporate Bonds With Bloomberg Terminals
  1. How To Analyze Corporate Bonds With Bloomberg Terminals: Introduction
  2. How To Analyze Corporate Bonds With Bloomberg Terminals: Analyzing Corporate Bonds
  3. How To Analyze Corporate Bonds With Bloomberg Terminals: Valuing Corporate Bonds
  4. How To Analyze Corporate Bonds With Bloomberg Terminals: Trading Bonds On Bloomberg
  5. How To Analyze Corporate Bonds With Bloomberg Terminals: Conclusion

How To Analyze Corporate Bonds With Bloomberg Terminals: Introduction

Bloomberg was originally designed as a tool for bond traders, and as such it's capabilities for analyzing corporate bonds are extremely robust. This article will provide an overview of some of the functions users might find helpful when evaluating and trading corporate bonds. A good place to start is by using Bloomberg to screen for bonds that meet certain criteria. For example, if you know you are interested in purchasing IBM bonds but don't know precisely which issue you want, Bloomberg can help. By typing the ticker symbol for IBM into the Bloomberg <IBM> followed by the corporate bond function key <CORP> you will receive a listing of all the available corporate bond issues that IBM has. The bonds will be listed in maturity order, and by clicking on any issue you will be able to pull up details on the bond.

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How To Analyze Corporate Bonds With Bloomberg Terminals: Analyzing Corporate Bonds

  1. How To Analyze Corporate Bonds With Bloomberg Terminals: Introduction
  2. How To Analyze Corporate Bonds With Bloomberg Terminals: Analyzing Corporate Bonds
  3. How To Analyze Corporate Bonds With Bloomberg Terminals: Valuing Corporate Bonds
  4. How To Analyze Corporate Bonds With Bloomberg Terminals: Trading Bonds On Bloomberg
  5. How To Analyze Corporate Bonds With Bloomberg Terminals: Conclusion
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