Electronic Trading Tutorial
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  1. Electronic Trading: Introduction
  2. Electronic Trading: The Nasdaq Vs. The NYSE
  3. Electronic Trading: The Role of a Specialist
  4. Electronic Trading: The Role of a Market Maker
  5. Electronic Trading: SuperDOT
  6. Electronic Trading: Electronic Communications Networks (ECNs)
  7. Electronic Trading: Small Order Execution System (SOES)
  8. Electronic Trading: Level I, II and III Access
  9. Electronic Trading: Conclusion

Electronic Trading: Introduction


When it comes to electronic trading, for most individual investors, taking a long-term buy-and-hold approach is probably the best strategy. Most of us simply don't have the time or the expertise to trade for a living. But for some investors, trading can be an extremely lucrative profession.

There have always been professionals who made their living off of trading. It wasn't until recently, however, that technology enabled individuals who weren't working for a brokerage to directly access the markets. This tutorial will delve into the workings of the electronic systems that allow this direct access. We'll also talk about the differences between the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) and the Nasdaq and learn how market trades are executed, both by market makers and by specialists.

Whether you are an aspiring trader or a seasoned investor looking to find out how it all works, this tutorial explains all the nitty-gritty electronic trading systems in layman's terms. Is electronic trading a new way for you to build you own portfolio? Read on to find out!

(If you aren't familiar with stocks and trading on the stock market, read Stock Basics Tutorial.)

Electronic Trading: The Nasdaq Vs. The NYSE

  1. Electronic Trading: Introduction
  2. Electronic Trading: The Nasdaq Vs. The NYSE
  3. Electronic Trading: The Role of a Specialist
  4. Electronic Trading: The Role of a Market Maker
  5. Electronic Trading: SuperDOT
  6. Electronic Trading: Electronic Communications Networks (ECNs)
  7. Electronic Trading: Small Order Execution System (SOES)
  8. Electronic Trading: Level I, II and III Access
  9. Electronic Trading: Conclusion
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