Financial Careers: Finance Employers
  1. Financial Careers: Introduction
  2. Financial Careers: Qualifications and Credentials
  3. Financial Careers: Finance Employers
  4. Financial Careers: Investment Banking Jobs
  5. Financial Careers: Trading Jobs
  6. Financial Careers: Financial Advisory Jobs
  7. Financial Careers: Analytical Jobs
  8. Financial Careers: Financial Media Jobs
  9. Financial Careers: Analyst Jobs
  10. Financial Careers: Portfolio Management Jobs
  11. Financial Careers: Conclusion

Financial Careers: Finance Employers


By Brian Perry
While there are many different types of entities that higher finance employees, this tutorial will primarily focus upon some of the most common types of institutions where finance jobs can be found. In this chapter, we will look at a broad outline of common finance firms; later, we will examine some of these in more detail as we discuss specific roles in the finance industry.

Investment Banks
Investment banks usually specialize in giving strategic advice to corporations, providing financing to companies, governments, and other large institutions, and in buying and selling stocks, bonds, and other securities. Common jobs found at investment banks include investment bankers, security salespeople and traders.

Commercial Banks
Commercial banks usually specialize in taking deposits from individuals and making loans to corporations, individuals, and governments. Many large commercial banks also engage in traditional investment banking endeavors such as capital raising and trading. Common roles at a commercial bank include loan officer or bank teller, as well as investment bankers, security salespeople, and traders. Note: the lines between investment banks and commercial banks have blurred over the years and there are very few "pure" investment banks or commercial banks. In practice, most firms considered "investment banks" are either commercial banks from a regulatory standpoint or operate as a division of a large commercial bank.

Money Management Firms
Money management firms usually specialize in managing investments for individuals or institutions. Very large firms might manage a wide variety of asset classes while smaller boutique firms might focus on a particular market niche, such as
small-cap stocks or high-yield bonds. Common roles at a money management firm include portfolio manager or security analyst.

Hedge Funds
Hedge funds are similar to money management firms in that they also manage money for institutions and wealthy individuals. However, they are often known for taking more risk than some "traditional" money management firms and are generally more focused upon providing very high returns. Hedge funds sometimes have a broader mandate than traditional money management firms and have fewer restrictions on how they can invest. Common roles at hedge funds include portfolio manager or security analyst.

Private Equity Firms
Private equity firms usually manage money for institutions and wealthy individuals. While hedge funds and money management firms usually buy and sell public securities, private equity firms usually purchase entire corporations. When a private equity firm purchases a public company, it "takes it private," which gives the industry its name. Private equity firms usually attempt to profit either by improving the operations of the companies they purchase or by using financial engineering to increase the return on owners' equity. Eventually the private equity firm seeks to either resell the companies they own or take them public again in order to make a profit for themselves and their investors. Most employees at private equity firms are investment bankers, and their functions can include analyzing potential purchases, negotiating deals, raising financing, or attempting to improve portfolio companies' operations and profitability. (To learn more, see What Is Private Equity?)

Real Estate Firms
Real estate firms attempt to either develop new real estate projects or purchase existing projects in an effort to better manage them and increase the returns. Common finance jobs at a real estate firm include financing specialist, analyst or deal manager. Note: many leading private equity firms also invest in real estate.

"Real Money"
Real money institutional investors invest money for an entity such as a pension fund, sovereign wealth fund, or insurance company in an effort to generate returns over time that will allow the organization to meet its financial goals. Common roles at "real money" firms include investment analyst, portfolio manager or trader.

Summary
In subsequent chapters this tutorial will examine common finance jobs and what they entail. By combining the type of job you want with the type of organization you want to work for, you will be well on your way to the finance career you are looking for.

Financial Careers: Investment Banking Jobs

  1. Financial Careers: Introduction
  2. Financial Careers: Qualifications and Credentials
  3. Financial Careers: Finance Employers
  4. Financial Careers: Investment Banking Jobs
  5. Financial Careers: Trading Jobs
  6. Financial Careers: Financial Advisory Jobs
  7. Financial Careers: Analytical Jobs
  8. Financial Careers: Financial Media Jobs
  9. Financial Careers: Analyst Jobs
  10. Financial Careers: Portfolio Management Jobs
  11. Financial Careers: Conclusion
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