Hedge Funds: Risks
AAA
  1. Hedge Funds: Introduction
  2. Hedge Funds: Structures
  3. Hedge Funds: Strategies
  4. Hedge Funds: Characteristics
  5. Hedge Funds: Performance Measurement
  6. Hedge Funds: Risks
  7. Hedge Funds: Why Choose Hedge Funds?
  8. Hedge Funds: The Due Diligence Process
  9. Hedge Funds: Funds Of Funds
  10. Hedge Funds: Conclusion
Hedge Funds: Risks

Hedge Funds: Risks

By Dan Barufaldi

Hedge funds are often mistaken to be very similar in risk to other types of investments, and although they are often measured through the same types of quantitative metrics, hedge funds have qualitative risks that make them unique to evaluate and analyze. In the following section of this tutorial, we'll evaluate some of the most common risk metrics used in hedge fund analysis as well as some of the broad qualitative issues that should be evaluated. Unfortunately, a full evaluation of all quantitative and qualitative hedge fund risks is beyond the scope of this tutorial.

Standard Deviation
The most common risk measure used in both hedge fund and mutual fund evaluations is standard deviation. Standard deviation in this case is the level of volatility of returns measured in percentage terms, and usually provided on an annual basis. Standard deviation gives a good indication of the variability of annual returns and makes it easy to compare to other funds when combined with annual return data. For example, if comparing two funds with identical annualized returns, the fund with a lower standard deviation would normally be more attractive, if all else is equal. (Learn more in Understanding Volatility Measurements.)

Unfortunately, and particularly when related to hedge funds, standard deviation does not capture the total risk picture of returns. This is because most hedge funds do not have normally distributed returns, and standard deviation assumes a bell-shaped distribution, which assumes the same probability of returns being above the mean as below the mean.

Figure 2: Standard Deviation Chart
Source: Investopedia, 2009.

Most hedge fund returns are skewed in one direction or another and the distribution is not as symmetrical. For this reason, there are a number of additional metrics to use when evaluating hedge funds, and even with the additional metrics, some risks simply cannot be measured.

Another measure that provides an additional dimension of risk is called value-at-risk (VaR). VaR measures the dollar-loss expectation that can occur with a 5% probability. In Figure 2, this is the area to the left of the vertical black line on the left of the graph. This provides additional insight into the historical returns of a hedge fund because it captures the tail end of the returns to the down side. It adds another dimension because it makes it possible to compare two funds with different average returns and standard deviation. For example, if Fund A has an average return of 12% and a standard deviation of 6%, and Fund B has an average return of 24% with a standard deviation of 12%, VaR would indicate the dollar amount of loss that is possible with each fund with a 5% probability.

Put another way, VaR would tell you with 95% confidence that your losses would not exceed a certain point. (You can never be 100% confident that you won't lose an entire investment.) It tries to answer the question "Given an investment of a particular return and volatility, what's the worst that could happen?" (Read more about this measure at Introduction To Value At Risk.)

Downside Capture
In relation to hedge funds, and in particular those that claim absolute return objectives, the measure of downside capture can indicate how correlated a fund is to a market when the market declines. The lower the downside capture, the better the fund preserves wealth during market downturns. This metric is figured by calculating the cumulative return of the fund for each month that the market/benchmark was down, and dividing it by the cumulative return of the market/benchmark in the same time frame. Perfect correlation with the market will equate to a 100% downside capture and typically is only possible when comparing the benchmark to itself.

Drawdown
Another measure of a fund's risk is maximum drawdown. Maximum drawdown measures the percentage drop in cumulative return from a previously reached high. This metric is good for identifying funds that preserve wealth by minimizing drawdowns throughout up/down cycles, and gives an analyst a good indication of the possible losses that this fund can experience at any given point in time. Months to recover, on the other hand, gives a good indication of how quickly a fund can recuperate losses. Take the case where a hedge fund has a maximum drawdown of 4%, for example. If it took three months to reach that maximum drawdown, as investors, we would want to know if the returns could be recovered in three months or less. In some cases where the drawdown was sharp, it should take longer to recover. The key is to understand the speed and depth of a drawdown with the time it takes to recover these losses. Do they make sense given the strategy?

Leverage
Finally, leverage is a measure that often gets overlooked, yet is one of the main reasons why hedge funds incur huge losses. As leverage increases, any negative effect in returns gets magnified and worse, and causes the fund to sell assets at steep discounts to cover margin calls. Leverage has been the primary reason why hedge funds like LTCM and Amaranth have gone out of business. Each of these funds may have had huge losses due to the investments made, but chances are these funds could have survived had it not been for the impact of leverage and the effect it had on the liquidation process. (For more on the possible dangers of leverage, see Hedge Funds' Higher Returns Come At A Price.)

Qualitative Factors
Despite the additional quantitative metrics available for the analysis of risk, many of which were not even covered in this tutorial, qualitative risks are as important if not more important, particularly when evaluating hedge funds. Since they are unregulated pools of funds and their strategies are more complex, it is imperative that a thorough analysis be completed on items other than numbers.

One of the most important evaluations is that of management. A fund must have good, strong management just like a company. A talented hedge fund manager with strong stock-picking abilities may perform well, but his contribution to success will be blunted if the fund is not managed properly.

The same could be said of back-office operations, including trading, compliance, administration, marketing, systems, etc. In many cases, a hedge fund will outsource many of the non-investment functions to third-party firms, and we will cover some of these service providers later in the tutorial. But whether they have some of these functions in-house or if they are outsourced, they need to be at a level that allows for the effective functioning of the investment management process. For example, it is critical to have adequate systems to measure risks within a portfolio at any given time, so that the hedge fund manager can feel confident that his strategy is intact throughout. It is also important for trading systems to be able to implement the hedge fund manager's ideas so as to maximize the expected returns of the investments and to minimize trading costs that would otherwise harm returns.

Scale is another measure that is critical to a hedge fund's success, and although one might use quantifiable metrics to evaluate scale, it takes a subjective opinion to determine whether a fund's strategy will be impacted by having too large of a fund and by how much returns will be affected. Hedge fund managers often answer this question by providing both a soft-close limit and a hard-close limit to new funding, in addition to their opinion on how much they can actually manage and still be effective.

A soft close indicates that no additional investors will be allowed into the fund, while a hard close indicates that the fund will no longer accept any additional investments. A fund's capacity, for that matter, should then be higher than the level indicated for a hard close. Otherwise, it would imply that the fund will accept investments up until the point where they can no longer achieve the same returns with their stated strategy. An analyst should be cautious of a hedge fund manager that doesn't close at the time indicated, even if the manager states that he or she is finding opportunities in other areas that will allow for continued growth. In the latter case, you should be cautious of style drift and investigate whether the manager has any skills related to these "new opportunities." (For more insight, read Focus Pocus May Not Lead To Magical Returns.)

Conclusion
When analyzing hedge funds, the important thing to remember is to look beyond the numbers and statistics. An investor can be lured into an inappropriate investment if the qualitative factors mentioned above are not analyzed within the context of the overall strategy. While there are some risks that should be unconditional, such as management integrity, there are others that can vary by hedge fund strategy. Only after a comprehensive and detailed analysis of all risks can one truly understand the investment.

Hedge Funds: Why Choose Hedge Funds?

  1. Hedge Funds: Introduction
  2. Hedge Funds: Structures
  3. Hedge Funds: Strategies
  4. Hedge Funds: Characteristics
  5. Hedge Funds: Performance Measurement
  6. Hedge Funds: Risks
  7. Hedge Funds: Why Choose Hedge Funds?
  8. Hedge Funds: The Due Diligence Process
  9. Hedge Funds: Funds Of Funds
  10. Hedge Funds: Conclusion
Hedge Funds: Risks
RELATED TERMS
  1. Compound Annual Growth Rate - CAGR

    The year-over-year growth rate of an investment over a specified ...
  2. Return On Investment - ROI

    A performance measure used to evaluate the efficiency of an investment ...
  3. Bear Fund

    A mutual fund designed to provide higher returns when the market ...
  4. Mean-Variance Analysis

    The process of weighing risk against expected return. Mean variance ...
  5. Ulcer Index - UI

    An indicator developed by Peter G. Martin and Byron B. McCann ...
  6. Subprime Meltdown

    The sharp increase in high-risk mortgages that went into default ...
  1. How do you flip a home?

    Flipping (also called wholesale real estate investing) is a type of real estate investment strategy in which an investor ...
  2. Is it a good idea to buy mutual funds from banks?

    Mutual funds offer consumers a great way to access a professionally-managed group of assets at a relatively low cost, with ...
  3. What is the difference between investing and trading?

    Investing and trading are two very different methods of attempting to profit in the financial markets. The goal of investing ...
  4. What is the difference between weighted average shares outstanding and basic weighted ...

    Outstanding shares refers to stock that is currently held by investors, including shares held by the public, and restricted ...
comments powered by Disqus
Related Tutorials
  1. Top ETFs And What They Track: A Tutorial
    Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Top ETFs And What They Track: A Tutorial

  2. Analyzing The Best Retirement Plans And Investment Options
    Retirement

    Analyzing The Best Retirement Plans And Investment Options

  3. Commodities Outlook For The Remainder Of 2012
    Trading Strategies

    Commodities Outlook For The Remainder Of 2012

  4. The Complete Guide To Retirement Planning For 30-Somethings
    Taxes

    The Complete Guide To Retirement Planning For 30-Somethings

  5. Broker Summary: Fidelity Online Brokerage
    Trading Systems & Software

    Broker Summary: Fidelity Online Brokerage

Trading Center