Beginner's Guide to Trading Fixed Income: Conclusion
  1. Beginner's Guide to Trading Fixed Income: Introduction
  2. Beginner's Guide to Trading Fixed Income: Part 1 - Basic structure of the fixed-income market
  3. Beginner's Guide to Trading Fixed Income: Part 2 - Process for trading fixed-income securities
  4. Beginner's Guide to Trading Fixed Income: Part 3 - Mechanics of trading a fixed-income security
  5. Beginner's Guide to Trading Fixed Income: Conclusion

Beginner's Guide to Trading Fixed Income: Conclusion

Part 4 - Conclusion
This Beginner's Guide has provided an overview to trading fixed-income securities. In many ways, fixed income is more complicated to trade than equities, due to the preponderance of issues outstanding and the lack of transparency in the market. However, by having a process in place for monitoring the market, screening the available universe of issues, determining fair value for a security and executing a trade, individuals can be reasonably sure of buying and selling securities in a manner that helps them meet their investment goals.

SEE: Taxation Rules For Bond Investors

  1. Beginner's Guide to Trading Fixed Income: Introduction
  2. Beginner's Guide to Trading Fixed Income: Part 1 - Basic structure of the fixed-income market
  3. Beginner's Guide to Trading Fixed Income: Part 2 - Process for trading fixed-income securities
  4. Beginner's Guide to Trading Fixed Income: Part 3 - Mechanics of trading a fixed-income security
  5. Beginner's Guide to Trading Fixed Income: Conclusion
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