Advanced Guide To The Bloomberg Terminal: Mutual Funds And ETFs
  1. Advanced Guide To The Bloomberg Terminal: Introduction
  2. Advanced Guide To The Bloomberg Terminal: Equity Functions: Fundamental And Technical Analysis
  3. Advanced Guide To The Bloomberg Terminal: Equity Functions: Monitoring Markets, Trading And Options
  4. Advanced Guide To The Bloomberg Terminal: Bond Market Functions
  5. Advanced Guide To The Bloomberg Terminal: Mutual Funds And ETFs
  6. Advanced Guide To The Bloomberg Terminal: Currencies And Commodities
  7. Advanced Guide To The Bloomberg Terminal: Conclusion

Advanced Guide To The Bloomberg Terminal: Mutual Funds And ETFs

Bloomberg was initially designed as a tool for institutional investors, rather than retail investors. Therefore, it has traditionally focused more closely upon asset classes dominated by institutional investors (i.e. government and mortgage backed bonds) rather than retail products such as mutual funds. However, this has begun to change, especially as more and more institutional investors utilize exchange traded funds (ETFS) to gain market exposures.If you are interested in mutual funds or ETFs, the best place to begin is with the "FUNDS" page, accessed by typing <FUND> into Bloomberg. This page provides a menu detailing a wide variety of functions that may be of interest to investors in these products. Among the most popular are a search engine that allows investors to search for funds that are for example focused upon China or corporate bonds. There is also a full suite of news menus specific to the mutual fund and ETF business. Investors may also want to take a look at some of the multiple security analytic tools which will allow them to compare and contrast the returns for similar securities (for instance two ETFs that track the high-yield bond market.)

SEE: How To Pick The Best ETF




As with other asset classes, there is a description function for ETFs and mutual funds. This function provides an overview of the market capitalization and daily volume of the security, as well as high and low prices. Importantly, the description function also provides an overview of the holdings of a particular ETF or mutual fund. These holdings can be valuable in providing investors with insight into precisely what underlying securities the fund in question holds. In addition to individual securities, the holdings are also broken down to show concentration by geographic region, asset class, and sector.

Description Function for an ETF Displaying Fund Holdings <DES>



Advanced Guide To The Bloomberg Terminal: Currencies And Commodities

  1. Advanced Guide To The Bloomberg Terminal: Introduction
  2. Advanced Guide To The Bloomberg Terminal: Equity Functions: Fundamental And Technical Analysis
  3. Advanced Guide To The Bloomberg Terminal: Equity Functions: Monitoring Markets, Trading And Options
  4. Advanced Guide To The Bloomberg Terminal: Bond Market Functions
  5. Advanced Guide To The Bloomberg Terminal: Mutual Funds And ETFs
  6. Advanced Guide To The Bloomberg Terminal: Currencies And Commodities
  7. Advanced Guide To The Bloomberg Terminal: Conclusion
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