Beginner's Guide To FXCM: Services Offered
  1. Beginner's Guide To FXCM: Introduction
  2. Beginner's Guide To FXCM: Services Offered
  3. Beginner's Guide To FXCM: Opening A Demo Account
  4. Beginner's Guide To FXCM: Basic Navigation
  5. Beginner's Guide To FXCM: Charting Software
  6. Beginner's Guide To FXCM: Trade Management
  7. Beginner's Guide To FXCM: Advanced Features And Resources
  8. Beginner's Guide To FXCM: Conclusion

Beginner's Guide To FXCM: Services Offered

FXCM offers a "No Dealing Desk" trading model that allows traders to interact with liquidity directly, without dealing-desk intervention. There are three types of accounts, all of which function under the no dealing desk model. Micro accounts can be opened for as little as $50, Standard accounts require a $2,000 initial deposit and Active Trader accounts require a $50,000 minimum deposit.

When starting an account, traders can choose from a number of software/trading platforms: Trading Station (download), Trading Station Web (online), mobile trading (download), MetaTrader 4 (download) and Active Trader (Active Trader accounts only).

Registered as a Futures Commission Merchant (FCM) and Retail Foreign Exchange Dealer (RFED), FXCM is a member of the National Futures Association (NFA).

SEE: Top 7 Questions About Currency Trading Answered

Figure 1: Additional FXCM advantages


Beginner's Guide To FXCM: Opening A Demo Account

  1. Beginner's Guide To FXCM: Introduction
  2. Beginner's Guide To FXCM: Services Offered
  3. Beginner's Guide To FXCM: Opening A Demo Account
  4. Beginner's Guide To FXCM: Basic Navigation
  5. Beginner's Guide To FXCM: Charting Software
  6. Beginner's Guide To FXCM: Trade Management
  7. Beginner's Guide To FXCM: Advanced Features And Resources
  8. Beginner's Guide To FXCM: Conclusion
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