Beginner's Guide To
  1. Beginner's Guide To Introduction
  2. Beginner's Guide To Using The SharpCharts Workbench
  3. Beginner's Guide To Chart Attributes
  4. Beginner's Guide To Changing The Chart Type
  5. Beginner's Guide To Indicators
  6. Beginner's Guide To Annotating Charts

Beginner's Guide To Introduction

Introduction is one of the most relied-upon websites for technical traders and chartists. The site was launched in 2009, and boasts some of the most visually appealing charts on the web and offers a host of technical tools, both free and premium. Beyond charts, the site offers technical scans, commentary from noted technicians such as John Murphy and a wide variety of educational materials. In fact, there is an entire section named "Chart School" dedicated to teaching readers about analysis techniques, charting methods and technical indicators.

SEE: Beginner's Guide To MetaTrader 4

While the site boasts tons of features; the star is definitely the charting. At the heart of the charting options is what has termed the Sharpchart. Sharpcharts are bar or candle stick charts presented in a very professional layout. The Sharpcharts Workbench is the site's signature charting tool and it allows users to create charts for any of the 25,000+ stocks, indices and mutual funds in its database. Beyond bar and candlestick charts, the workbench allows users to create even more exotic variations like Candle Volume and Heikin-Ashi charts. Once a user has selected the chart format, they can also select several different time frames, insert price overlays and include a host of technical indicators. The site offers users the ability to print, email and bookmart charts, and analyze them using the ChartNotes annotation tool.

SEE: Point And Figure Charting Basics.

While every type of chart, overlay and indicator is available to all users, there are some options reserved only for subscribed members. Free users can expect up to three years of data for both daily and weekly charts. However, only paying subscribers can look back further than three years or have access to intraday data. Paid subscribers also can view monthly charts and, in many cases, have access to over 20 years of data. They can also save customized ChartStyles and store charts that can be accessed from any web-connected device. Subscribers to their "Extra" service can also store charts in multiple ChartLists, store annotated charts and optionally view charts using real-time data. Visit the site to learn more about what each subscription level provides.

Beginner's Guide To Using The SharpCharts Workbench

  1. Beginner's Guide To Introduction
  2. Beginner's Guide To Using The SharpCharts Workbench
  3. Beginner's Guide To Chart Attributes
  4. Beginner's Guide To Changing The Chart Type
  5. Beginner's Guide To Indicators
  6. Beginner's Guide To Annotating Charts
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