Index Investing: Conclusion
  1. Index Investing: Introduction
  2. Index Investing: What Is An Index?
  3. Index Investing: The Dow Jones Industrial Average
  4. Index Investing: The Standard & Poor's 500 Index
  5. Index Investing: The Nasdaq Composite Index
  6. Index Investing: The Wilshire 5000 Total Market Index
  7. Index Investing: The Russell 2000 Index
  8. Index Investing: Other Indexes
  9. Index Investing: Index Funds
  10. Index Investing: Conclusion

Index Investing: Conclusion


We hope this tutorial has given you insight into how you can track the market, use it as a benchmark and make investments.

Some points to remember:

  • An index is a statistical measure of the changes in a portfolio of stocks representing the overall market.
  • The first index was created by Charles Dow in May 1896. It has evolved into what we know today as the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA).
  • The DJIA uses price-based weighting, but most of the other indexes use market capitalization based weighting.
  • The DJIA contains 30 of the largest companies in the U.S. It is what most people are referring to when they talk about "the market."
  • The S&P 500 includes 500 of the largest U.S. companies. More and more, it is seen as the benchmark of the U.S. stock market.
  • The Nasdaq Composite Index represents all the companies on the Nasdaq. It is heavy with tech companies and is more volatile than other market indexes.
  • The Wilshire 5000 Total Market Index contains more than 6,500 stocks and is the largest index in the U.S.
  • The Russell 2000 measures the performance of small caps that often get left out of the other big indexes.
  • There are literally thousands of other indexes, tracking various regions and industries.
  • Most mutual funds don't beat the market.
  • Index funds have lower expense ratios than other mutual funds and allow investors to get the market return.

  1. Index Investing: Introduction
  2. Index Investing: What Is An Index?
  3. Index Investing: The Dow Jones Industrial Average
  4. Index Investing: The Standard & Poor's 500 Index
  5. Index Investing: The Nasdaq Composite Index
  6. Index Investing: The Wilshire 5000 Total Market Index
  7. Index Investing: The Russell 2000 Index
  8. Index Investing: Other Indexes
  9. Index Investing: Index Funds
  10. Index Investing: Conclusion
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  2. Broad-Based Index

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  3. Standard & Poor's 500 Index - S&P 500

    An index of 500 stocks chosen for market size, liquidity and ...
  4. Dow Jones Industrial Average - DJIA

    The Dow Jones Industrial Average is a price-weighted average ...
  5. Index

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  6. Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) Yield

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RELATED FAQS
  1. Is it possible to invest in an index?

    First, let's review the definition of an index. An index is essentially an imaginary portfolio of securities representing ... Read Answer >>
  2. What is the difference between the Dow and the Nasdaq?

    Because of the way people throw around the words "Dow" and "Nasdaq," both terms have become synonymous with "the market," ... Read Answer >>
  3. How does a point change in a major index effect its equivalent exchange-traded fund?

    The S&P 500 and Dow Jones Industrial Index (DJIA) are two of the most well-known indexes tracking the movement of the ... Read Answer >>
  4. How do indexes determine which stocks are removed or added to them?

    Stock indexes are formed based on the kinds of stocks or financial securities they want to track. For example, the Standard ... Read Answer >>
  5. What is the best way to measure the total market?

    There is a variety of market indices which function as statistical gauges of the market's activities. Many investors look ... Read Answer >>
  6. What are the pros and cons of using the S&P 500 as a benchmark?

    Learn about the advantages and disadvantages of using the S&P 500 as a benchmark for portfolio performance, and understand ... Read Answer >>

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