Inflation: Conclusion
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  1. Inflation: Introduction
  2. Inflation: What Is Inflation?
  3. Inflation: How Is It Measured?
  4. Inflation: Inflation And Interest Rates
  5. Inflation: Inflation And Investments
  6. Inflation: Conclusion

Inflation: Conclusion

After reading this tutorial, you should have some insight into inflation and its effects. For starters, you now know that inflation isn't intrinsically good or bad. Like so many things in life, the impact of inflation depends on your personal situation.

Some points to remember:

  • Inflation is a sustained increase in the general level of prices for goods and services.
  • When inflation goes up, there is a decline in the purchasing power of money.
  • Variations on inflation include deflation, hyperinflation and stagflation.
  • Two theories as to the cause of inflation are demand-pull inflation and cost-push inflation.
  • When there is unanticipated inflation, creditors lose, people on a fixed-income lose, "menu costs" go up, uncertainty reduces spending and exporters aren't as competitive.
  • Lack of inflation (or deflation) is not necessarily a good thing.
  • Inflation is measured with a price index.
  • The two main groups of price indexes that measure inflation are the Consumer Price Index and the Producer Price Indexes.
  • Interest rates are decided in the U.S. by the Federal Reserve. Inflation plays a large role in the Fed's decisions regarding interest rates.
  • In the long term, stocks are good protection against inflation.
  • Inflation is a serious problem for fixed income investors. It's important to understand the difference between nominal interest rates and real interest rates.
  • Inflation-indexed securities offer protection against inflation but offer low returns.

  1. Inflation: Introduction
  2. Inflation: What Is Inflation?
  3. Inflation: How Is It Measured?
  4. Inflation: Inflation And Interest Rates
  5. Inflation: Inflation And Investments
  6. Inflation: Conclusion
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