Intermediate Guide To E-Mini Futures Contracts
  1. Intermediate Guide To E-Mini Futures Contracts - Introduction
  2. Intermediate Guide To E-Mini Futures Contracts - Popular E-Mini Contracts
  3. Intermediate Guide To E-Mini Futures Contracts - Volume And Volatility
  4. Intermediate Guide To E-Mini Futures Contracts - Margin
  5. Intermediate Guide To E-Mini Futures Contracts - Rollover Dates And Expiration
  6. Intermediate Guide To E-Mini Futures Contracts - E-Mini Brokers
  7. Intermediate Guide To E-Mini Futures Contracts - Tax Advantages

Intermediate Guide To E-Mini Futures Contracts - Introduction

E-minis are electronically traded futures contracts that represent a percentage of a corresponding standard futures contract. The e-minis make ideal beginner trading instruments for a variety of reasons, including round-the-clock trading, low margin rates, volatility and liquidity. The Beginner's Guide to E-Mini Futures Contracts provides an introduction to these contracts, including definitions and descriptions of e-mini characteristics and specifications. This intermediate tutorial provides a more in-depth look at these versatile and popular contracts.

Intermediate Guide To E-Mini Futures Contracts - Popular E-Mini Contracts

  1. Intermediate Guide To E-Mini Futures Contracts - Introduction
  2. Intermediate Guide To E-Mini Futures Contracts - Popular E-Mini Contracts
  3. Intermediate Guide To E-Mini Futures Contracts - Volume And Volatility
  4. Intermediate Guide To E-Mini Futures Contracts - Margin
  5. Intermediate Guide To E-Mini Futures Contracts - Rollover Dates And Expiration
  6. Intermediate Guide To E-Mini Futures Contracts - E-Mini Brokers
  7. Intermediate Guide To E-Mini Futures Contracts - Tax Advantages
RELATED TERMS
  1. Derivative

    A security with a price that is dependent upon or derived from ...
  2. Warrant

    A derivative that confers the right, but not the obligation, ...
  3. Swap

    A derivative contract through which two parties exchange financial ...
  4. Hedge

    Making an investment to reduce the risk of adverse price movements ...
  5. Convergence

    The movement of the price of a futures contract towards the spot ...
  6. Futures Market

    An auction market in which participants buy and sell commodity/future ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is a derivative?

    A derivative is a contract between two or more parties whose value is based on an agreed-upon underlying financial asset, ... Read Answer >>
  2. Do hedge funds invest in commodities?

    Learn about hedge funds that invest in commodities. Read about Commodity Trading Advisors who focus specifically on trading ... Read Answer >>
  3. Can mutual funds invest in options and futures? (RYMBX, GATEX)

    Learn how mutual funds invest in stock options and futures to benefit from commodities price swings and hedge their portfolio ... Read Answer >>
  4. How do futures contracts roll over?

    Learn about why futures contracts are often rolled over into forward month contracts prior to expiration, and understand ... Read Answer >>
  5. Why do companies enter into futures contracts?

    Learn how companies use futures contracts for the purposes of hedging their exposure to price fluctuations as well as for ... Read Answer >>
  6. What does a futures contract cost?

    Learn about values of futures contracts and the initial margin a trader must place in an account to open a futures position, ... Read Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Keynesian Economics

    An economic theory of total spending in the economy and its effects on output and inflation. Keynesian economics was developed ...
  2. Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunications ...

    A member-owned cooperative that provides safe and secure financial transactions for its members. Established in 1973, the ...
  3. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles - GAAP

    The common set of accounting principles, standards and procedures that companies use to compile their financial statements. ...
  4. DuPont Analysis

    A method of performance measurement that was started by the DuPont Corporation in the 1920s. With this method, assets are ...
  5. Call Option

    An agreement that gives an investor the right (but not the obligation) to buy a stock, bond, commodity, or other instrument ...
  6. Economies Of Scale

    Economies of scale is the cost advantage that arises with increased output of a product. Economies of scale arise because ...
Trading Center