Introduction To Dividends
  1. Introduction To Dividends: Introduction
  2. Introduction To Dividends: Terms To Know And Other Basics
  3. Introduction To Dividends: Dividend Dates
  4. Introduction To Dividends: Investing In Dividend Stocks
  5. Introduction To Dividends: Doing Your Homework And Taxes
  6. Introduction To Dividends: Conclusion

Introduction To Dividends: Introduction

A dividend is a distribution of a portion of a company's earnings to a class of its shareholders. Dividends can be in the form of cash, stock, and less commonly, property. Most stable companies offer dividends to shareholders. Often the stock prices of these financially secure companies do not move much, and dividends are offered as a way to entice, reward and retain investors.

Investing in dividend-paying stocks can be an effective method of building long-term wealth. This guide with introduce dividend terminology and explore the basics of dividends - from how dividends work, to researching, reinvestment and taxes.

Introduction To Dividends: Terms To Know And Other Basics

  1. Introduction To Dividends: Introduction
  2. Introduction To Dividends: Terms To Know And Other Basics
  3. Introduction To Dividends: Dividend Dates
  4. Introduction To Dividends: Investing In Dividend Stocks
  5. Introduction To Dividends: Doing Your Homework And Taxes
  6. Introduction To Dividends: Conclusion
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