Money Market: Banker's Acceptance
  1. Money Market: Introduction
  2. Money Market: What Is It?
  3. Money Market: Treasury Bills (T-Bills)
  4. Money Market: Certificate Of Deposit (CD)
  5. Money Market: Commercial Paper
  6. Money Market: Banker's Acceptance
  7. Money Market: Eurodollars
  8. Money Market: Repos
  9. Money Market: Conclusion

Money Market: Banker's Acceptance

A bankers' acceptance (BA) is a short-term credit investment created by a non-financial firm and guaranteed by a bank to make payment. Acceptances are traded at discounts from face value in the secondary market.

For corporations, a BA acts as a negotiable time draft for financing imports, exports or other transactions in goods. This is especially useful when the creditworthiness of a foreign trade partner is unknown.

Acceptances sell at a discount from the face value:

Face Value of Banker\'s Acceptance $1,000,000
Minus 2% Per Annum Commission for One Year -$20,000
Amount Received by Exporter in One Year $980,000

One advantage of a banker's acceptance is that it does not need to be held until maturity, and can be sold off in the secondary markets where investors and institutions constantly trade BAs.
Money Market: Eurodollars

  1. Money Market: Introduction
  2. Money Market: What Is It?
  3. Money Market: Treasury Bills (T-Bills)
  4. Money Market: Certificate Of Deposit (CD)
  5. Money Market: Commercial Paper
  6. Money Market: Banker's Acceptance
  7. Money Market: Eurodollars
  8. Money Market: Repos
  9. Money Market: Conclusion


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