Money Market: Eurodollars
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  1. Money Market: Introduction
  2. Money Market: What Is It?
  3. Money Market: Treasury Bills (T-Bills)
  4. Money Market: Certificate Of Deposit (CD)
  5. Money Market: Commercial Paper
  6. Money Market: Banker's Acceptance
  7. Money Market: Eurodollars
  8. Money Market: Repos
  9. Money Market: Conclusion

Money Market: Eurodollars

Contrary to the name, eurodollars have very little to do with the euro or European countries. Eurodollars are U.S.-dollar denominated deposits at banks outside of the United States. This market evolved in Europe (specifically London), hence the name, but eurodollars can be held anywhere outside the United States.

The eurodollar market is relatively free of regulation; therefore, banks can operate on narrower margins than their counterparts in the United States. As a result, the eurodollar market has expanded largely as a way of circumventing regulatory costs.

The average eurodollar deposit is very large (in the millions) and has a maturity of less than six months. A variation on the eurodollar time deposit is the eurodollar certificate of deposit. A eurodollar CD is basically the same as a domestic CD, except that it's the liability of a non-U.S. bank. Because eurodollar CDs are typically less liquid, they tend to offer higher yields.

The eurodollar market is obviously out of reach for all but the largest institutions. The only way for individuals to invest in this market is indirectly through a money market fund.

Money Market: Repos

  1. Money Market: Introduction
  2. Money Market: What Is It?
  3. Money Market: Treasury Bills (T-Bills)
  4. Money Market: Certificate Of Deposit (CD)
  5. Money Market: Commercial Paper
  6. Money Market: Banker's Acceptance
  7. Money Market: Eurodollars
  8. Money Market: Repos
  9. Money Market: Conclusion
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