Money Market: Repos
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  1. Money Market: Introduction
  2. Money Market: What Is It?
  3. Money Market: Treasury Bills (T-Bills)
  4. Money Market: Certificate Of Deposit (CD)
  5. Money Market: Commercial Paper
  6. Money Market: Banker's Acceptance
  7. Money Market: Eurodollars
  8. Money Market: Repos
  9. Money Market: Conclusion

Money Market: Repos

Repo is short for repurchase agreement. Those who deal in government securities use repos as a form of overnight borrowing. A dealer or other holder of government securities (usually T-bills) sells the securities to a lender and agrees to repurchase them at an agreed future date at an agreed price. They are usually very short-term, from overnight to 30 days or more. This short-term maturity and government backing means repos provide lenders with extremely low risk.

Repos are popular because they can virtually eliminate credit problems. Unfortunately, a number of significant losses over the years from fraudulent dealers suggest that lenders in this market have not always checked their collateralization closely enough.

There are also variations on standard repos:

  • Reverse Repo - The reverse repo is the complete opposite of a repo. In this case, a dealer buys government securities from an investor and then sells them back at a later date for a higher price
  • Term Repo - exactly the same as a repo except the term of the loan is greater than 30 days.
Money Market: Conclusion

  1. Money Market: Introduction
  2. Money Market: What Is It?
  3. Money Market: Treasury Bills (T-Bills)
  4. Money Market: Certificate Of Deposit (CD)
  5. Money Market: Commercial Paper
  6. Money Market: Banker's Acceptance
  7. Money Market: Eurodollars
  8. Money Market: Repos
  9. Money Market: Conclusion
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