Ratio Analysis Tutorial
  1. Ratio Analysis: Introduction
  2. Ratio Analysis: Finding The Data
  3. Ratio Analysis: Using Financial Ratios

Ratio Analysis: Introduction

Fundamental analysis has a very broad scope. One aspect looks at the general (qualitative) factors of a company. The other side considers tangible and measurable factors (quantitative). This means crunching and analyzing numbers from the financial statements. If used in conjunction with other methods, quantitative analysis can produce excellent results.

Ratio analysis isn't just comparing different numbers from the balance sheet, income statement and cash flow statement. It's comparing the number against previous years, other companies, the industry or even the economy in general. Ratios look at the relationships between individual values and relate them to how a company has performed in the past, and how it might perform in the future.

For example, current assets alone don't tell us a whole lot, but when we divide them by current liabilities we are able to determine whether the company has enough money to cover short-term debts.

In this tutorial, we'll show you how to use ratio analysis to analyze financial reports. Comparing these ratios against numbers from previous years, other companies, industry averages and the economy in general can tell you a lot about where a company might be headed. Valuing a company is no easy task. This tutorial will shed some light on how it can be done and, ultimately, help you to make more informed choices as an investor.

Ratio Analysis: Finding The Data

  1. Ratio Analysis: Introduction
  2. Ratio Analysis: Finding The Data
  3. Ratio Analysis: Using Financial Ratios
  1. Qualitative Analysis

    Securities analysis that uses subjective judgment based on nonquantifiable ...
  2. Profit and Loss Statement (P&L)

    A financial statement that summarizes the revenues, costs and ...
  3. Liquidity

    The degree to which an asset or security can be quickly bought ...
  4. Profit Margin

    Profit margin is part of a category of profitability ratios calculated ...
  5. Quarter - Q1, Q2, Q3, Q4

    A three-month period on a financial calendar that acts as a basis ...
  6. Debt Ratio

    A financial ratio that measures the extent of a company’s or ...
  1. Why might two companies calculate capital employed differently?

    The primary reason there are different ways of calculating a company's capital employed is because there are different definitions ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What information should I look at on a publicly traded company for use in fundamental ...

    In finance, fundamental analysis focuses on estimating a company's value based on the underlying factors that affect its ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How do you analyze inventory on the balance sheet?

    In accounting, inventory represents a company's raw materials, work in progress and finished products. Financial professionals ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. To what extent should you take a company's liquidity ratio into account before investing ...

    Investors, analysts and lenders use financial ratios to evaluate the health of businesses. Liquidity ratios highlight the ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What does low working capital say about a company's financial prospects?

    When a company has low working capital, it can mean one of two things. In most cases, low working capital means the business ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Do nonprofit organizations have working capital?

    Nonprofit organizations continuously face debate over how much money they bring in that is kept in reserve. These financial ... Read Full Answer >>

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