Ratio Analysis: Using Financial Ratios
  1. Ratio Analysis: Introduction
  2. Ratio Analysis: Finding The Data
  3. Ratio Analysis: Using Financial Ratios

Ratio Analysis: Using Financial Ratios

There is a lot to be said for valuing a company, it is no easy task. If you have yet to discover this goldmine, the satisfaction one gets from tearing apart a companies financial statements and analyzing it on a whole different level is great - especially if you make or save yourself money for your efforts.

In this section we will try to present 19 basic fundamental analysis ratios to help you get started. The ratios are presented in a simplified manner to make them easier to understand. Sure some of the ratios have different varieties, but by the end you will understand the basic premise and reasons for fundamental analysis.

The Ratios:

Performance Activity
Book Value Per Common Share Asset Turnover
Cash Return On Assets Average Collection Period
Vertical Analysis Inventory Turnover
Dividend Payout Ratio Financing
Earnings Per Share Debt Ratio
Gross Profit Margin Debt / Equity Ratio
Price/Earnings Ratio Liquidity Warnings
Profit Margin Acid-Test Ratio
Return on Assets Interest Coverage
Return on Equity Working Capital

  1. Ratio Analysis: Introduction
  2. Ratio Analysis: Finding The Data
  3. Ratio Analysis: Using Financial Ratios
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