Liquidity Measurement Ratios
  1. Liquidity Measurement Ratios: Introduction
  2. Liquidity Measurement Ratios: Current Ratio
  3. Liquidity Measurement Ratios: Quick Ratio
  4. Liquidity Measurement Ratios: Cash Ratio
  5. Liquidity Measurement Ratios: Cash Conversion Cycle

Liquidity Measurement Ratios: Introduction

By Richard Loth (Contact | Biography)

The first ratios we'll take a look at in this tutorial are the liquidity ratios. Liquidity ratios attempt to measure a company's ability to pay off its short-term debt obligations. This is done by comparing a company's most liquid assets (or, those that can be easily converted to cash), its short-term liabilities.

In general, the greater the coverage of liquid assets to short-term liabilities the better as it is a clear signal that a company can pay its debts that are coming due in the near future and still fund its ongoing operations. On the other hand, a company with a low coverage rate should raise a red flag for investors as it may be a sign that the company will have difficulty meeting running its operations, as well as meeting its obligations.

The biggest difference between each ratio is the type of assets used in the calculation. While each ratio includes current assets, the more conservative ratios will exclude some current assets as they aren't as easily converted to cash.

The ratios that we'll look at are the current, quick and cash ratios and we will also go over the cash conversion cycle, which goes into how the company turns its inventory into cash.

To find the data used in the examples in this section, please see the Securities and Exchange Commission's website to view the 2005 Annual Statement of Zimmer Holdings.

Liquidity Measurement Ratios: Current Ratio

  1. Liquidity Measurement Ratios: Introduction
  2. Liquidity Measurement Ratios: Current Ratio
  3. Liquidity Measurement Ratios: Quick Ratio
  4. Liquidity Measurement Ratios: Cash Ratio
  5. Liquidity Measurement Ratios: Cash Conversion Cycle
RELATED TERMS
  1. Current Ratio

    The current ratio is a liquidity ratio measuring a company's ...
  2. Cash Ratio

    The ratio of a company's total cash and cash equivalents to its ...
  3. Cash Asset Ratio

    The current value of marketable securities and cash, divided ...
  4. Quick Ratio

    The quick ratio is an indicator of a company’s short-term liquidity. ...
  5. Ratio Analysis

    A ratio analysis is a quantitative analysis of information contained ...
  6. Cash Return On Assets Ratio

    A ratio used to compare a businesses performance among other ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What are some alternative liquidity ratios to the cash ratio?

    Learn what the cash ratio measures, and understand what two other liquidity ratios can be used by a company to replace the ... Read Answer >>
  2. What is the relationship between the cash ratio and liquidity?

    Understand the relationship between a company's cash ratio and its liquidity. Learn what the cash ratio measures and what ... Read Answer >>
  3. How can a company quickly increase its liquidity ratio?

    Discover what high and low values in the liquidity ratio mean and what steps companies can take to improve liquidity ratios ... Read Answer >>
  4. To what extent should you take a company's liquidity ratio into account before investing ...

    Find out how important it is for an investor to know a company's liquidity ratio before deciding to invest, and why relying ... Read Answer >>
  5. How do stock dividends affect the retained earnings account?

    Understand the difference between financial ratio analysis and accounting ratio analysis. Learn why ratio analysis is important ... Read Answer >>
  6. What does the cash ratio of a company measure, and how does it affect decision making?

    Learn what the cash ratio of a company measures, and understand why its an important liquidity ratio for a company to use ... Read Answer >>

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