Roth IRAs Tutorial
  1. Roth IRAs: Introduction
  2. Roth IRAs: Eligibility Requirements
  3. Roth IRAs: Contributions
  4. Roth IRAs: Distributions
  5. Roth IRAs: Conclusion

Roth IRAs: Introduction

The Roth IRA is a retirement saving account to which individuals can make contributions with after-tax dollars. If certain requirements are met, distributions from the Roth IRA will be tax-free. Here we look at the Roth Individual Retirement Account (IRA), how it works, how to set one up, and how distributions are taxed. Why Establish a Roth IRA?
The Roth IRA is an excellent supplement to an individual's retirement nest egg. It accrues earnings on a tax-deferred basis, but these earnings amounts are tax free if certain requirements are met. For Roth IRAs, contributions are not tax deductible but qualified distributions are tax free. Contributions to the Roth IRA are discretionary, so individuals can choose when they want to fund their Roth IRA.

Roth IRAs: Eligibility Requirements

  1. Roth IRAs: Introduction
  2. Roth IRAs: Eligibility Requirements
  3. Roth IRAs: Contributions
  4. Roth IRAs: Distributions
  5. Roth IRAs: Conclusion
  1. Crude Oil

    Crude oil is a naturally occurring, unrefined petroleum product ...
  2. Leg

    A leg is one component of a derivatives trading strategy, in ...
  3. Grant

    The issuance of an award, such as a stock option, to key employees ...
  4. Put-Call Parity

    A principle that defines the relationship between the price of ...
  5. Maturity

    The period of time for which a financial instrument remains outstanding. ...
  6. Employee Stock Option - ESO

    A stock option granted to specified employees of a company. ESOs ...
  1. Can you make catch-up contributions to a Roth IRA?

    Roth individual retirement accounts (IRAs) allow you to contribute after-tax dollars to an account with the ability to take ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Can you have both a 401(k) and an IRA?

    Investors can have both a 401(k) and an individual retirement account (IRA) at the same time, and it is quite common to have ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Are 401(k) contributions tax deductible?

    All contributions to qualified retirement plans such as 401(k)s reduce taxable income, which lowers the total taxes owed. ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Are 401(k) rollovers taxable?

    401(k) rollovers are generally not taxable as long as the money goes into another qualifying plan, an individual retirement ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Are catch-up contributions included in the 415 limit?

    Unlike regular employee deferrals, catch-up contributions are not included in the 415 limit. While there is an annual limit ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Can catch-up contributions be matched?

    Depending on the terms of your plan, catch-up contributions you make to 401(k)s or other qualified retirement savings plans ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Barefoot Pilgrim

    A slang term for an unsophisticated investor who loses all of his or her wealth by trading equities in the stock market. ...
  2. Quick Ratio

    The quick ratio is an indicator of a company’s short-term liquidity. The quick ratio measures a company’s ability to meet ...
  3. Black Tuesday

    October 29, 1929, when the DJIA fell 12% - one of the largest one-day drops in stock market history. More than 16 million ...
  4. Black Monday

    October 19, 1987, when the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) lost almost 22% in a single day. That event marked the beginning ...
  5. Monetary Policy

    Monetary policy is the actions of a central bank, currency board or other regulatory committee that determine the size and ...
  6. Indemnity

    Indemnity is compensation for damages or loss. Indemnity in the legal sense may also refer to an exemption from liability ...
Trading Center