Financial Tables: Options Table
  1. Financial Tables: Introduction
  2. Financial Tables: Stock Tables/Quotes
  3. Financial Tables: Stock Ticker
  4. Financial Tables: Bond Table
  5. Financial Tables: Mutual Fund Table
  6. Financial Tables: Currency Table
  7. Financial Tables: Options Table

Financial Tables: Options Table


Finally, let's take a look at the Options table:


Column 1: Strike Price.

This is the stated price per share for which underlying stock may be purchased (for a call) or sold (for a put) by the option holder upon exercise of the option contract. When you exercise a call option, this is the value for which you purchase the shares. Option strike prices typically move in increments of $2.50 or $5. In the example above, the strike price moves in $2 increments.

Column 2: Expiry Date. This shows the end of the life of an options contract. Options expire on the third Friday of the expiry month.

Column 3: Call or Put. This column refers to whether the option is a call or a put. A call is the option to purchase, whereas a put is the option to sell.

Column 4: Volume. This indicates the total number of options contracts traded for the day. The total volume of all contracts is listed at the bottom of each table.

Column 5: Bid. The price someone is willing to pay for the options contract. To get the cost of one contract you need to multiply the price by 100.

Column 6: Ask. The price for which someone is willing to sell an options contract. To get the cost of one contract you need to multiply the price by 100.

Column 7: Open Interest. Open interest is the number of options contracts that are open. These are contracts that have not expired or have not been exercised.

  1. Financial Tables: Introduction
  2. Financial Tables: Stock Tables/Quotes
  3. Financial Tables: Stock Ticker
  4. Financial Tables: Bond Table
  5. Financial Tables: Mutual Fund Table
  6. Financial Tables: Currency Table
  7. Financial Tables: Options Table
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RELATED FAQS
  1. How do I change my strike price once the trade has been placed already?

    Learn how the strike prices for call and put options work, and understand how different types of options can be exercised ... Read Answer >>
  2. What is the difference between open interest and volume?

    Learn more about options, what options' volume and open interest are and the difference between volume and open interest ... Read Answer >>
  3. After exercising a put option, can I still hold my option contract in order to sell ...

    Once a put option contract has been exercised, that contract does not exist anymore. A put option grants you the right to ... Read Answer >>
  4. Does the seller (the writer) of an option determine the details of the option contract?

    The quick answer is yes and no. It all depends on where the option is traded. An option contract is an agreement between ... Read Answer >>
  5. What happens when a security reaches its strike price?

    Learn more about the moneyness of stock options and what happens when the underlying security's price reaches the option ... Read Answer >>
  6. How are call options priced?

    Learn how aspects of an underlying security such as stock price and potential for fluctuations in that price, affect the ... Read Answer >>
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