The Federal Reserve
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  1. The Federal Reserve: Introduction
  2. The Federal Reserve: What Is The Fed?
  3. The Federal Reserve: Duties
  4. The Federal Reserve: Monetary Policy
  5. The Federal Reserve: The FOMC Rate Meeting
  6. The Federal Reserve: Conclusion

The Federal Reserve: Introduction

Most people are aware that there is a government body that acts as the guardian of the economy - an economic sentinel who implements policies designed to keep the country operating smoothly. Unfortunately, most investors do not understand how or why the government involves itself in the economy.

In the U.S., the answer lies in the role of the Federal Reserve, or simply, the Fed. The Fed is the gatekeeper of the U.S. economy. It is the bank of the U.S. government and, as such, it regulates the nation's financial institutions. The Fed watches over the world's largest economy and is, therefore, one of the most powerful organizations on earth.

As an investor, it is essential to acquire a basic knowledge of the Federal Reserve System. The Fed dictates economic and monetary policies that have profound impacts on individuals in the U.S. and around the world. In this tutorial, we'll learn about how the Fed is structured, find out who Alan Greenspan and Ben Bernanke are and talk about monetary policy and the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) rate meeting.

The Federal Reserve: What Is The Fed?

  1. The Federal Reserve: Introduction
  2. The Federal Reserve: What Is The Fed?
  3. The Federal Reserve: Duties
  4. The Federal Reserve: Monetary Policy
  5. The Federal Reserve: The FOMC Rate Meeting
  6. The Federal Reserve: Conclusion
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