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Absolute advantage is the ability of an individual, company or country to produce a good or service at a lower cost than any competitor. An entity with an absolute advantage requires fewer inputs and/or has more efficient processes, allowing it to undercut its competitors’ prices and earn higher profits.

International trade theory, however, tells us that two entities will benefit from specialization based on their areas of comparative advantage.

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