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The business cycle refers to the fluctuations in economic activity that an economy experiences over a period of time. It consists of expansions - or periods of economic growth - and contractions, or periods of economic decline. During expansions, employment, production, sales and incomes increase. During contractions - also called recessions - unemployment rises, production slows, sales decrease and incomes stagnate or decline.

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