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Capitalism is an economic system in which the free market alone controls the production of goods and services. It stands in direct contrast to government-controlled economies, where production and prices are set by a central decision-making body.
 
Economist Adam Smith famously compared free markets to an “invisible hand” pushing producers toward goods and services for which there is greatest need.
 
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