Understanding Corporate Structure

Next video:
Loading the player...

All publicly traded companies share the same basic corporate structure. Find out how the management hierarchy works, what responsibilities belong to whom, and who’s looking out for shareholders.

Related Articles
  1. Economics

    What Do Central Counterparty Clearing Houses Do?

    A central counterparty clearing house facilitates trading in European derivatives and equities markets.
  2. Investing Basics

    What Does a Transfer Agent Do?

    Transfer agents maintain the records and documents related to shareholder accounts.
  3. Investing Basics

    What Is Schedule 13G Used For?

    Schedule 13G is an SEC form an investor must file upon taking ownership of 5% or more of a company’s outstanding shares.
  4. Taxes

    6 Reasons to Donate Your Car to Charity

    It's no longer a free ride, but there are still tax benefits to doing so.
  5. Economics

    What Does Vesting Mean?

    Vesting is the process of accruing non-forfeitable rights.
  6. Economics

    What's a Conglomerate?

    A conglomerate is a corporation that’s comprised of several different independent businesses.
  7. Investing Basics

    Breaking Down Optimal Capital Structure

    An optimal capital structure shows the best balance of debt to equity a company can have in order to minimize its cost of capital.
  8. Economics

    Explaining Interest

    Interest is the price charged to borrow money, and is typically expressed as a percentage of the principal, or the amount loaned.
  9. Investing Basics

    What is Convertible Preferred Stock?

    Convertible preferred stock is preferred stock that can be converted into common stock as of a predetermined date at a specified ratio.
  10. Term

    What is a Preemptive Right?

    A preemptive right allows select shareholders to buy newly issued shares in their corporation before the general public.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Zero-Sum Game

    A situation in which one person’s gain is equivalent to another’s loss, so that the net change in wealth or benefit is zero. ...
  2. Capitalization Rate

    The rate of return on a real estate investment property based on the income that the property is expected to generate.
  3. Gross Profit

    A company's total revenue (equivalent to total sales) minus the cost of goods sold. Gross profit is the profit a company ...
  4. Revenue

    The amount of money that a company actually receives during a specific period, including discounts and deductions for returned ...
  5. Normal Profit

    An economic condition occurring when the difference between a firm’s total revenue and total cost is equal to zero.
  6. Operating Cost

    Expenses associated with the maintenance and administration of a business on a day-to-day basis.
Trading Center
You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!