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A designated market maker, or DMM, maintains fair and orderly markets for an assigned set of listed firms. This also helps improve market liquidity. The New York Stock Exchange created this position in 2008 to offer better service than electronic-only platforms. The DMM is a point of contact for the listed company, and provides them with information such as trader sentiment and who has been trading the stock.

 

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