Economic Value Added - EVA



Next video:
Loading the player...

Learn about this metric that measures a company's financial performance based on its residual wealth.

Related Articles
  1. Investing

    Explaining Residual Value

    Residual value is a measurement of how much a fixed asset is worth at the end of its lease, or at the end of its useful life.
  2. Trading

    Valuing A Company Using The Residual Income Method

    Learn the underlying basics behind the residual income model and how it can be used to place an absolute value on a firm.
  3. Investing

    What are Metrics?

    Metrics are tools that measure a company’s performance.
  4. Trading

    EVA: What Does It Really Mean?

    By David Harper, (Contributing Editor - Investopedia Advisor) Contact David As we performed a sequence of calculations to find Disney's (DIS) 2004 economic profit, we discovered that despite ...
  5. Investing

    Understanding Basis Points

    Learn more about this frequently stated measure of stock performance.
  6. Financial Advisor

    How Big Is the Wealth Management and Financial Advisor Industry?

    Learn about the world's $74 trillion in managed assets, and why the wealth management industry is drastically different following the financial crisis of 2007-2008.
  7. Financial Advisor

    Career Advice: Financial Planner Vs. Wealth Manager

    Understand the differences between a career in financial planning and wealth management, and identify which is better for you based on your goals and talents.
  8. Trading

    Working Capital

    Working capital is one of the basic metrics used to evaluate a company's financial health. Find out what it can tell you about a stock and learn how to calculate it.
  9. Managing Wealth

    Interpreting A Strategy Performance Report

    These key performance metrics will help you decide if your trading strategy is a winner.
  10. Financial Advisor

    Key Metrics to Measure Your Advisory Practice

    These key metrics can help financial advisors measure their success.
Hot Definitions
  1. Glass-Steagall Act

    An act the U.S. Congress passed in 1933 as the Banking Act, which prohibited commercial banks from participating in the investment ...
  2. Quantitative Trading

    Trading strategies based on quantitative analysis which rely on mathematical computations and number crunching to identify ...
  3. Bond Ladder

    A portfolio of fixed-income securities in which each security has a significantly different maturity date. The purpose of ...
  4. Duration

    A measure of the sensitivity of the price (the value of principal) of a fixed-income investment to a change in interest rates. ...
  5. Dove

    An economic policy advisor who promotes monetary policies that involve the maintenance of low interest rates, believing that ...
  6. Cyclical Stock

    An equity security whose price is affected by ups and downs in the overall economy. Cyclical stocks typically relate to companies ...
Trading Center