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Fiscal Policy refers to the combined governmental decisions regarding a country's taxing and spending.  The term fiscal policy is associated with British economist John Maynard Keynes, who believed that governments should influence macroeconomic productivity levels by doing such things as improving the employment rate, combating inflation, and flattening business cycles.

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