Next video:
Loading the player...

An initial public offering (IPO) marks the start of a company's publicly traded life. Find out why companies undergo IPOs, and how the process works.

Related Articles
  1. Insights

    Why Are Companies Taking Longer To Go Public?

    Learn why private companies are waiting longer to have their IPOs. Understand why it may be more advantageous for a company to stay private.
  2. Investing

    How To Track Upcoming IPOs

    Interested in investing through IPOs? Here is the list of free sources for information on upcoming IPOs.
  3. Investing

    How An IPO Is Valued

    The initial valuation of an IPO can determine the success or failure of a specific stock - but how is that price determined?
  4. Investing

    2011's Biggest IPOs

    2011 was another big year for IPOs.
  5. Insurance

    4 Hottest IPOs in 2015

    Where is smart money headed this year? These are the most anticipated IPOs of 2015.
  6. Insurance

    Evaluating The Facebook IPO

    Facebook's IPO is sure to be the biggest IPO of the year. Find out what to expect.
  7. Investing

    4 Reasons for the IPO Market Slowdown in 2016 (IPO)

    Pay attention to the length of time a company waits before going public and whether the prolonged period brings excessive valuation.
  8. Investing

    Tech IPOs Have Been Heating up (FDC, TEAM)

    While the market for tech IPOs has stalled a bit lately, it seems to be mounting a recovery.
Hot Definitions
  1. Net Profit Margin

    Net Margin is the ratio of net profits to revenues for a company or business segment - typically expressed as a percentage ...
  2. Gross Margin

    A company's total sales revenue minus its cost of goods sold, divided by the total sales revenue, expressed as a percentage. ...
  3. Current Ratio

    The current ratio is a liquidity ratio measuring a company's ability to pay short-term and long-term obligations, also known ...
  4. SEC Form 13F

    A filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), also known as the Information Required of Institutional Investment ...
  5. Quantitative Easing

    An unconventional monetary policy in which a central bank purchases private sector financial assets in order to lower interest ...
  6. Risk Averse

    A description of an investor who, when faced with two investments with a similar expected return (but different risks), will ...
Trading Center